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Cystoscopy

(Cystourethroscopy)
  • Definition

    A cystoscopy is a procedure to examine the bladder with a lighted scope. The scope allows the doctor to look through the urethra and into the bladder. The urethra is a tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body.
    Cystoscopy of the Bladder
    nucleus image
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.
  • Reasons for Procedure

    Cystoscopy may be done to if you have the following symptoms:
    Some abnormalities can be diagnosed through cystoscopy, including:
    • Tumors
    • Bladder stones
    • Inflammation
    • Cysts
    • Pouches on the bladder wall
    • Ulcers on the bladder wall
    • Polyps
    • Narrowing of the urethra
    • Enlargement of the prostate gland in men
  • Possible Complications

    Problems from this procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems. Complications may include:
    • Infection
    • Bleeding
    • Damage of the bladder wall with the cystoscope—rare
    Factors that may increase the risk of complications include:
    • Smoking
    • Active infection
    • Diabetes
    • Bleeding disorder
    Talk to your doctor about these risks before the procedure.
  • What to Expect

    Prior to Procedure
    This procedure is usually done in your doctor's office.
    Anesthesia
    Local anesthesia is used to numb the area in and around the urethra. A sedative may also be given to help you relax.
    Description of the Procedure
    You will lie on an exam table. A cystoscope will be inserted through the urinary opening, into the urethra, and into the bladder. Your bladder will be drained of urine. A sample will be kept for testing. Next, your bladder will be filled with sterile water or saline solution. This will allow a better view of the bladder walls. The bladder and urethra will be examined.
    How Long Will It Take?
    Up to 15 minutes
    How Much Will It Hurt?
    Local anesthesia will keep you free from pain. You may feel some discomfort or the urge to urinate when the bladder is filled during the exam.
    Post-procedure Care
    After the procedure, you may experience a burning sensation or see small amounts of blood when you urinate.
  • Call Your Doctor

    After arriving home, contact your doctor if any of the following occur:
    • Frequency, urgency, burning, or pain when urinating
    • You are unable to urinate or empty your bladder completely
    • Blood in your urine after 24 hours
    • Signs of infection; including fever and chills
    • Pain in your abdomen, back, or side
    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.
  • RESOURCES

    Urology Care Foundation http://www.urologyhealth.org

    National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov

    CANADIAN RESOURCES

    Health Canada http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

    Women's Health Matters http://womenshealthmatters.ca

    References

    Cystoscopy. Urology Care Foundation website. Available at: http://www.urologyhealth.org/urology/index.cfm?article=77. Updated January 2011. Accessed March 3, 2014.

    Cytoscopy and ureteroscopy. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse website. Available at: http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/cystoscopy. Updated March 28, 2012. Accessed March 3, 2014.

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